What type of cover would you like?

UK Cover

UK cover protects you in the event of a breakdown anywhere in the UK

European Cover

European cover protects you in the event of a breakdown anywhere in Europe

UK & European Cover

UK & European cover protects you in the event of a breakdown whilst in the UK or Europe

Would you like National Recovery?

Yes

UK recovery takes your vehicle, yourself, and up to 8 people to a chosen destination anywhere in the UK

No

No, I do not need that level of cover on my policy

How about Replacement Hire Car?

Yes

Replacement vehicle for up to 3 days whilst yours is being repaired. Alternative transport costs can be covered (up to £150 per person, max £500) as well as 1 nights accommodation.

No

No, I do not need that level of cover on my policy

Would you like At Home Rescue?

Yes

RAC attend if your car breaks down at home, or within 1/4 mile of your house.

No

No, I do not need that level of cover on my policy

Would you like personal or vehicle based cover?

Personal Cover

Personal based cover protects you if you breakdown when driving or whilst travelling as a passenger in any car

Vehicle Cover

Vehicle based cover only protects the vehicle or vehicles you have taken a breakdown policy out on, and not you personally

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RAC warns of 50% rise in fuel duty

A rise in fuel-efficient petrol, diesel and electric cars could see fuel duty increase by up to 50% in the future, in order to cover a £13 billion gap in the Treasury.
RAC warns of 50% rise in fuel duty

The RAC Foundation has announced its predictions based on an investigation and report into the future of motoring tax.  The breakdown cover provider's charity has said that fuel duty collected by the Exchequer currently accounts for 1.7% of gross domestic product, or GDP, but this could drop to 1.1% by 2029.

Furthermore, vehicle excise duty is expected to drop significantly over the same period, falling from 0.4% of GDP to 0.1%.

The two drops together could amount to £13 billion lost.

RAC Foundation director Professor Stephen Glaister said: “As drivers endure record prices at the pumps they might be surprised to learn that future governments face a drought in motoring tax income.”

“The irony is that while ministers encourage us to buy greener, leaner cars, they are being forced to look at ways of clawing back the money motorists think they will be saving. This isn't scaremongering. The Treasury has already announced a review of VED bands to ensure drivers make a fair contribution to the public finances even as cars become more fuel-efficient."

An option for future Chancellors would be to raise fuel duty, but covering £13 billion would require an increase of 50%, which would be greeted with great dismay by UK drivers.