What type of cover would you like?

UK Cover

UK cover protects you in the event of a breakdown anywhere in the UK

European Cover

European cover protects you in the event of a breakdown anywhere in Europe

UK & European Cover

UK & European cover protects you in the event of a breakdown whilst in the UK or Europe

Would you like National Recovery?

Yes

UK recovery takes your vehicle, yourself, and up to 8 people to a chosen destination anywhere in the UK

No

No, I do not need that level of cover on my policy

How about Replacement Hire Car?

Yes

Replacement vehicle for up to 3 days whilst yours is being repaired. Alternative transport costs can be covered (up to £150 per person, max £500) as well as 1 nights accommodation.

No

No, I do not need that level of cover on my policy

Would you like At Home Rescue?

Yes

RAC attend if your car breaks down at home, or within 1/4 mile of your house.

No

No, I do not need that level of cover on my policy

Would you like personal or vehicle based cover?

Personal Cover

Personal based cover protects you if you breakdown when driving or whilst travelling as a passenger in any car

Vehicle Cover

Vehicle based cover only protects the vehicle or vehicles you have taken a breakdown policy out on, and not you personally

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Self-driving vehicles held back by poor 4G and potholes

Potholes can confuse autonomous vehicles while a weak 4G connection means they're unable to properly communicate with each other and traffic systems. 

Self-driving vehicles held back by poor 4G and potholes

The development of self-driving vehicles in the UK is being held back by poor broadband and potholes, a new report says 

Auditing, tax and advisory specialists KPMG found that the UK “lags behind other countries in 4G coverage” and that these slow speeds prevent autonomous vehicles from communicating with each other and traffic systems as effectively. 

The country’s commitment to providing better infrastructure was noted however, as a significant amount of 5G testing continues ahead of its launch in mid 2019.  

Potholes are a real issue for driverless cars because if road markings have been worn away they might not be able to read it properly and so could make the wrong decision on what to do. 

The UK’s pothole problem has been well documented, with this report highlighting that it’s particularly bad around smaller towns and villages which impacts the amount of driverless cars which can be used there.  

Public scepticism about driverless cars is also apparently higher in the UK than some of the other 25 countries KPMG included in the study.
 
Out of these 25 countries, the UK ranked seventh for how well its preparing for the arrival of driverless technology behind The Netherlands, Singapore, the US, Sweden and Finland.

Source: Express and Star